Texas doesn't hold back when it comes to giving towns weird names.

Texas is a huge state. It's the second largest state in the U.S. by land and population. It takes longer to get from certain places in Texas to other parts of Texas than it does to cross multiple states in other areas of the country.

With a state that big, it's not surprising that some of the town names are weird.

Here are 10 Texas town names that will make you really uncomfortable.

  • 1

    Ding Dong

    Nothing makes a fourth grader giggle faster than a phrase like "Ding Dong." Ding Dong is a small town south of Killeen in Central Texas. The town was named for two men, the Bells, whose storefront had a sign showing two bells and the words "ding" and "dong" under each bell.

  • 2

    Squeezepenny

    It is unknown how this strange name came to be. Squeezepenny is an unincorporated town near Melissa, north of McKinney.

  • 3

    Toadsuck

    Toadsuck is a ghost town in Grayson County, east of Wichita Falls. Some say it was named after Toadsuck, Arkansas, but it is known for sure that it took the name of its Toadsuck Saloon.

  • 4

    Scissors

    Scissors is right by the southern border of Texas, near Mexico. There is no story about how the town was named.

  • 5

    Noodle

    Noodle is out in the middle of no where, northeast of Sweetwater. It was named after the dried up Noodle Creek.

  • 6

    Big Lump

    Big Lump is another ghost town that used to be a coal mining community. It was in deep Central Texas, northwest of College Station. It was, obviously, named after the big lumps of coal.

  • 7

    Tool

    Tool is southeast of the Dallas metro area, near the Cedar Reservoir. Unknown where the name came from.

  • 8

    Uncertain

    Uncertain is on the Texas side of the Caddo Lake, near the border of Louisiana. They called it "Uncertain" because the settlers didn't know if they were on the Texas or Louisiana side of the lake.

  • 9

    Weeping Mary

    It is said that this town was named after a woman who refused to be sold into slavery. Weeping Mary is in North Texas, west of Nacogdoches.

  • 10

    Zipperlandville

    Zipperlandville is in Central Texas, east of Temple. It was named for the Zipperlen family and somehow got turned into Zipperlandville.