We’re used to wild weather here in the Lone Star State, but this year has been crazier than ever. 

And is it just me, or has the hail been particularly bad? I don’t recall ever seeing this much hail in one storm season. 

Our team has published several stories involving massive hail over the last couple of months and we’re not done yet. The latest video displaying Mother Nature pummeling the earth with hailstones comes from inside the Sam’s Club in Lubbock, Texas – and it’s unlike anything I have ever seen before. 

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The hail was coming down so hard that it was crashing through the skylights into the club. 

You see a couple of people trying to shield themselves by putting cardboard over their heads while others hold their hands over their heads. Some folks look like they’re not quite sure what to do. Not that I blame them. The situation is unprecedented. 

And that’s the good thing about sharing videos like this. It spreads awareness that this sort of thing is possible, so it helps to have an idea of what to do if you’re ever in the same boat. 

Obviously, getting into a cooler or the bathroom would be the safest bet. But as the creator of the video pointed out, there wasn’t really a clear path to get to safety. So, many people were in a safe spot and stayed put. 

Thankfully, the creator says everyone inside the store made it through okay.

@krish2281

♬ original sound - Kristina

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