The WFPD SWAT team made a major arrest yesterday (June 10).

WFPD Now reports that around 3:00 pm, the SWAT team was dispatched to a residence at 505 Lee Street to execute a search warrant alongside Crimes Against Property detectives to locate 35-year-old Nolan Sylvir Kerry, who was wanted for 13 felony arrest warrants in Kaufman County, Texas. Kerry was discovered in the residence and placed under arrest.

Detectives obtained a second search warrant to search the residence for stolen property. A search of the property revealed four stolen vehicles and other stolen items that had been obtained in a train robbery.

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Yet another warrant was issued to search Kerry’s residence at 814 N. Cottonwood Street in Wichita Falls. More stolen property was found by detectives during the search.

Kerry was taken to the Wichita County Jail and charged with 4 counts of burglary of a building, 1 count of criminal mischief greater than or equal to $750 but less than $2,500, 6 counts of engaging in organized criminal activity, 1 count of theft of property greater than or equal to $2,500 but less than $30,000 and 1 charge of theft of property greater than or equal to $30,000 but less than $100,000.

It is expected that even more charges will be filed against Kerry in the future due to property found while executing the search warrants, according to the Crimes Against Property detectives.

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